Monday, August 10, 2015

Pope Francis on El Salvador's woes

In an address yesterday, Pope Francis stated:

I am following with deep concern the news coming from El Salvador where recently the suffering of the population has worsened owing to the famine, the economic crisis, social clashes and growing violence. I encourage the beloved people of El Salvador to persevere united in hope and urge everybody to pray in order that justice and peace can flower once again in the land of the Blessed Oscar Romero.”
 In the same address, after reflecting on the anniversary of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the pope stated:
Above all, this sad anniversary urges us to pray and strive for peace, to spread brotherhood throughout the world and a climate of peaceful coexistence between peoples. May one cry rise up from every land, ‘No’ to war and violence and ‘Yes’ to dialogue and to peace.  With war one always loses. The only way to win a war is never to wage it.

4 comments:

Carlos X said...

* February 18, 2001. That's the last time a Pope--the now Saint John Paul II--mentioned El Salvador in a list of trouble spots for which the pope was praying or asking for prayers for. That was in connection with the 2001 earthquakes, and the time before had been November 1998 with reference to Hurricane Mitch. So, basically, this is the first time since civil war times that El Salvador pops up on the pontifical radar for man-made woes. That's the first thing that struck me about this news item.

The second thing that struck me is the order in which Francis listed the perceived problems: "famine, the economic crisis, social clashes and growing violence." There may be nothing to it; maybe he just made a random list. But if he did not, it is very interesting that he lists poverty and social inequality first (what this translation renders as "social clashes" can also be translated as "social contrasts"), and he leaves violence for last. I know many Salvadorans would dispute that ranking, as violence figures first and foremost in their dread hierarchy. It will be interesting to see how the Salvadoran Catholic Church construes this language.

Mike said...

As a frequent traveller to El Salvador (I too attended the beatification) I know the people feel their plight is finally on the Vatican's radar after so many years of oppression. We can only hope and pray things start to take a turn for the better there now that people in 'high places' have noticed.

Mike said...

As a frequent traveller to El Salvador (I too attended the beatification) I know the people feel their plight is finally on the Vatican's radar after so many years of oppression. We can only hope and pray things start to take a turn for the better there now that people in 'high places' have noticed.

Mike said...

As a frequent traveller to El Salvador (I too attended the beatification) I know the people feel their plight is finally on the Vatican's radar after so many years of oppression. We can only hope and pray things start to take a turn for the better there now that people in 'high places' have noticed.