Saturday, July 10, 2010

New crime prevention tactics proposed

As El Salvador struggles to cope with high levels of criminal violence, conservative elements in the country are advancing new (but not necessarily better) ways to combat crime.

The right wing parties in the National Assembly passed a lawd to require Bible reading in all El Salvador's schools at the start of every day. The belief is the a daily dose of scripture will cure the moral ills in El Salvador producing crime. Church leaders, both Catholic and evangelical, has spoken out against the law and its unnecessary mixing of government into faith affairs. Although the Bible readings are to be non-denominational and without any further explanation or preaching, the religious leaders question who makes decisions such as what passages to read and what translation of the Bible to use. Despite these issues, president Funes said he would not veto the law.

In a different get tough approach, ARENA proposed that hardened gang members should be incarcerated on an island in the Gulf of Fonseca. I guess it would be the Salvadoran version of Alcatraz. If there is no cell phone coverage offshore on the island, perhaps it will help with the problem of gang leaders instructing their subordinates by cell phone from behind bars.

4 comments:

Lawrence M. Ladutke said...

Another great ARENA idea: Forced conscription for gang members 16 and above. Besides violating international treaty obligations, this would have the effect of injecting a massive dose of corruption into the military at precisely the time it has been given an increased role in cracking down on crime! Oh, and the young gang members get more firepower!

POLYCARPIO said...

imI know folks are rightfully distrustful of the Army in El Salvador, but in the US, many Latinos send their kids to the armed forces, in part, based on the belief that it will do them some good. In fairness, the ARENA conscription proposal does stipulate that the gangmembers in the armed forces would NOT have access to weapons.

Lawrence M. Ladutke said...

For the record, I am not known as a particularly big fan of any army.

Let's also keep in mind the historical factor of the Salvadoran army (and the FMLN) using child combatants during the war. There needs to be a clear, sharp, no minors in the military line drawn in El Salvador.

POLYCARPIO said...

Hear, hear.